Tournament Structures & Tiebreakers

This article explains the ins and outs of various competitive structures currently able to be run on the Generation Esports platform, along with tiebreaker logic used to determine leaderboard standing. 

 

Queue System

  • Players/Rosters enter into a matchmaking pool within a designated window of time. 
  • The check-in window is typically 10 minutes. Once the window of time closes, matches are created.
  • Matchmaking factors in relative "skill" (MMR) of the currently active matchmaking pool of players/rosters that have entered. 
  • Read more about the queue system HERE
  • Matchmaking window(s) can be found on the Generation Esports dashboard under the following: 
    • Today's Play Times

Modified Swiss

  • Pre-scheduled matches, typically created each week. 
  • Matches up players/rosters by similar skill, using MMR (Matchmaking Rating). 
  • Matches can be found on the Generation Esports dashboard under the following: 
    • Today's Play Times
    • Future Play Times
    • Match History (completed matches)

Round Robin

  • Registered players/rosters are put into groups. 
  • Matches are pre-scheduled. Competitors will have their entire season scheduled in advance. 
  • Competitors will play each person in their group once at a minimum. 
    • Could play more if deemed necessary (i.e.) tiebreakers, double/triple round robin. 
  • Matches can be found on the Generation Esports dashboard under the following: 
    • Today's Play Times
    • Future Play Times
    • Match History (for completed matches)

Single Elimination (Knockout)

  • Generally used for playoffs/post-season stages. 
  • Competitors are put into a bracket with predetermined round times. 
  • Lose once, and that player/roster will be eliminated. 
  • Upcoming rounds and respective matchups can be viewed on the game's tournament page under the playoff bracket or "Matches" tab. 

GSL Groups

  • Generally used at the beginning of a playoffs/postseason stage. 
  • Competitors are put into a 2-sided bracket with a Group "A" and "B". 
  • Round days & times are predetermined. 
  • Lose once, and that player/roster will be put into a "lower bracket". 
    • Losing in the lower bracket results in elimination from the tournament. 
  • GSL acts as a feeder bracket into (most commonly) a single elimination knockout stage. 
    • (eg.) An 8-roster GSL Group bracket would involve 2 groups of 4, playing through a double elimination bracket. Instead of playing a "Grand Finals" match, the winners of both Groups' Upper & Lower Finals move on to the next stage of postseason play. 
  • GSL has an advantage over straight single elimination due to granting rosters "2 lives" in the bracket. The advantage against a straight double-elimination format is that GSL takes less time to complete. 

 

Double Elimination

  • Generally used for playoffs/post-season stages. 
  • Competitors are put into a bracket with predetermined round times. 
  • Lose once, and that player/roster will be put into a "lower bracket". 
    • Losing in the lower bracket results in elimination from the tournament. 
  • Upcoming rounds for upper/lower brackets and respective matchups can be viewed on the game's tournament page under the playoff bracket or "Matches" tab. 
  • Grand Finals (the last match) will be between the Upper Bracket and Lower Bracket finalists. 

What is a bracket reset?

  • In the grand finals of a double-elimination tournament, one of the two rosters/players competing (the one coming from the upper bracket) has not yet lost a match. A “bracket reset” occurs when the result of the grand finals match is a loss for the previously-undefeated roster, and another series is played (since in the case of double elimination, rosters are not fully eliminated until they have lost twice). 

Example of a double-elimination bracket: 

mceclip0.png

 

Tiebreaker Logic for Leaderboards

The leaderboard is ordered following the tiered protocol below. The leaderboard is updated after every match score is submitted. 

Step Criteria Explanation and notes
1 Wins Forfeit wins and bye wins are scored as a sweep win.
2 Head-to-head record

The head-to-head tiebreaker compares all participants with an equal record. Participants are ranked based on their collective win-loss performance against the other tied participants. In the ranking calculation, a match-win earns points while a match-loss earns negative points. Bye-wins are not considered and a forfeit loss is weighted more heavily than a standard loss.

3 Overall game win percentage Winning a match 3-0 is better than 3-2.
4 Round differential ("+/-")

Applicable competitions only:

Total rounds won minus total rounds lost across all matches inside the same stage. A higher positive value is better. (e.g. 15 rounds won and 10 rounds lost will have a round differential of +5).

5 Opponents' game win percentage It is better to beat an opponent who consistently won 3-0 than 3-2.
6 Forfeit losses Fewer is better.
7 Bye wins Fewer is better.
8 The number of wins earned before the first loss More wins is better.
9 Opponent's game win percentage in the first loss Higher opponent's game win percentage is better.